Category Archives: Dog As Pets

How To Measure Your Dog For A Collar?

How To Measure Your Dog For A Collar?

Dogs vary in shape and size depending on their breeds. A dog’s neck also varies in shape and size individually, with age and also according to the breed.

When you are buying a collar for your dog, you need to measure the circumference of your pet’s neck. However, in doing so, there are some things you have to keep in mind.

This is a general piece of advice on how to properly measure your dog’s neck before you buy a collar. The size of the collar is more important than the color or even type of the collar. Remember, if the collar is too big, it will snag on something or fall off your dog and if it is too small, it would be tight and would hurt your dog.

If you have a seamstress’s tape measure, you would be able to measure your dog’s neck with ease. If you don’t have one, you can use a piece of string to measure around your pet’s neck first and then measure the string with a tape measure or a ruler afterward.

Some important factors to consider

• While measuring, pull the tape/string snug but not too tight.
• As shown in the image, measure at the base of your dog’s neck A’ 
• After you have measured it snug, allow enough room to slip 1 finger between the dog’s neck and the tape/string for small dog breeds (weighing less than 10 pounds), 2 fingers for medium dogs and 3 fingers for large dogs (weighing over 80 pounds). Alternatively, after you have measured the neck snug, you can also add extra 1 inch for small dog breeds, 2 inches for medium and 3 inches for large dogs. This is to ensure that the collar is not too tight as tight collars can cause pain and injury to your pet.

Consider the length of the hair/fur

Depending on your pet’s breed, you may want to consider the length of their hair/fur before you settle on a measurement. The collar size depends on how much hair/fur is removed when your dog is groomed and how often is it groomed. Hair and fur grow faster in some dogs and if not trimmed regularly, you may have to adjust the size of the collar, accordingly.

You need to measure before and after grooming and find a collar that is going to fit your pet in both situations if the collar you are getting is not adjustable. Almost all collars are adjustable, which enables you to change accordingly in between haircuts.

Consider the thickness, strength, and width

The size and type of the collar also depend on your dog breed. If it is a large dog, you are going to need a collar that is thicker and stronger. Thicker collars provide more support and larger, stronger dogs would require thicker collars. For the collar to be strong, the width of the collar is another factor you may want to consider.

Wider collars are not only stronger but also reduce the pressure when you are using a leash with your collar. They also tend to be more comfortable for your pet. You can talk to your vet about finding the right pet collar if you are not sure on what type of collar you should use.

Measuring For A Tag Collar or Martingale

If you are measuring for a Tag collar or Martingale, you have to measure both ‘A‘ and ‘B‘ as shown in the image above. Then, choose a collar where the measurement ‘A‘ is approximately in the middle of the measurement range. For instance, if your dog’s neck (measurement ‘A‘) is 15 inches, you have to pick the one with size 13 – 18 inches rather than 15 – 20 inches.  Martingale collars need to fit over your dog’s head so you also need to consider measurement ‘B

 After you get your pet a collar that fits great, be sure to check it periodically to make sure it is still a good fit. If you have growing dogs or dogs with faster growing hair, you have to check them more often. Tight collars are very uncomfortable and can choke your pets.

Collars come in a variety of lengths. Here are some popular ones with approximate dog collar size (in inches): 

  • XX Small – adjustable 6″ – 8″
  • X Small – adjustable 8″ – 11″
  • Small – adjustable 10″ – 15″
  • Medium – adjustable 14″ – 19”
  • Large – adjustable 18″ – 24″
  • X Large – adjustable 23″ – 30+”

Here are the average weights (in pounds) and approximate collar measurements (in inches) for popular dog breeds:

These are just approximate measurements. You still need to measure your dog before ordering any collar to ensure a correct fit.

BREED WEIGHT (Avg.) COLLAR MEASUREMENT (Avg.)
Affenpinscher 6 – 13 lbs 12″-16″
Afghan Hound 50 – 65 lbs 16″-22″
Airedale Terrier 42 – 55 lbs 16″-22″
 Alaskan Malamute 75 – 125 lbs 18″-24″
 Akita  70 – 100+ lbs   20″-24″
 American Eskimo  18 – 35 lbs  16″-20″
American Indian Dog 30 – 60 lbs 16″-22″
American Pit Bull Terrier 35 – 55 lbs 14″-18”
 American Water Spaniel  25 – 45 lbs  18″-22″
Australian Kelpie 25 – 45 lbs 15″-21″
 Australian Terrier  12 – 14 lbs  12″-16″
Australian Shepherd 30 – 75 lbs 14″-22″
Basenji 22 – 24 lbs 16″-20″
Basset Hound 40 – 60 lbs 16″-24″
Beagle 18 – 31 lbs 12″-18″
Bedlington Terrier 17 – 23 lbs 14″-18″
Bernese Mountain Dog 70 – 100+ lbs 20″-28″
Bichon Frise 10 – 15 lbs 14″-18″
Bloodhound 80 – 110 lbs 22″-28″
Blue Heeler 30 – 35 lbs 22″-28″
Border Collie 30 – 45 lbs 14″-22″
Border Terrier 10 – 16 lbs 10″-15″
Bouvier des Flanders  60 – 80 lbs 20″-26″
Boston Terrier 10 – 25 lbs  12″-18″
Boxer  50 – 70 lbs 16″-22″
Brittany Spaniel 30 – 40 lbs 14″-20″
Brussels Griffon 5 – 12 lbs 12″-16″
Bull Terrier 52 – 62 lbs 16″-22″
Bulldog (American) 60 – 120 lbs 20″-25″
Bulldog (English) 40 – 55 lbs 18″-25″
Bulldog (French) 18 – 30 lbs  12″-20″
Bull Terrier 50 – 60 lbs 12″-18″
 Cairn Terrier  13 – 16 lbs  13″-16″
Caucasian Shepherd 80 – 200+ lbs 22″-28″
 Chesapeake Bay Retriever  55 – 70 lbs  21″-25″
 Chihuahua  2 – 6 lbs  8″-14″
Chinese Crested 5 – 10 lbs 8″-12″
 Chow-Chow   45 – 70 lbs  18″-24″
 Cocker Spaniel  24 – 28 lbs  12″-20″
 Collie  44 – 75 lbs  18″-24″
 Coon Hound  55 – 75 lbs   20″-24″
Corgi  25 – 38 lbs 14″-16″
 Curly-Coated Retriever  70 – 80 lbs  18″-24″
 Dachshund  15 – 27 lbs  12″-16″
 Dachshund (miniature)   9 – 15 lbs  10″-16″
 Dalmatian  45 – 65 lbs  14″-22″
 Doberman Pinscher  60 – 90 lbs  18″-24″
 English Cocker Spaniel  26 – 34 lbs  14″-18″
 English Setter 40 – 70 lbs  18″-24″
 English Springer Spaniel  40 – 50 lbs  14″-20″
 Eskimo  55 – 110 lbs  20″-24″
Fox Terrier 15 – 18 lbs 12″-18″
 German Shepherd  65 – 95 lbs  20″-26″
 German Shorthaired Pointer  45 – 70 lbs  20″-26″
 Golden Retriever  55 – 75 lbs  18″-24″
 Gordon Setter  45 – 80 lbs  18″-24″
 Great Dane  120 – 176+ lbs  22″-30″
 Great Pyrenees  85 – 100+ lbs  24″-30″
 Greyhound 60 – 80 lbs  15″-20″
Greyhound (Italian) 6 – 12 lbs 8″-11″
 Harrier  48 – 60 lbs  16″-22″
Havanese  7 – 13 lbs 8″-14″
 Irish Setter  55 – 70 lbs  18″-24″
 Irish Terrier  24 – 27 lbs  16″-22″
 Irish Water Spaniel  46 – 65 lbs  18″-22″
 Irish Wolfhound  105 – 120+ lbs  20″-28″
 Jack Russell Terrier  8 – 15 lbs  9″-15″
 Keeshond  35 – 40 lbs  18″-22″
 Kerry Blue Terrier  33 – 40 lbs  14″-20″
King Charles Cavalier 12 – 20 lbs 10-15″
 Labrador Retriever 55 – 80 lbs  22″-26″
Labradoodle 50 – 65 lbs 14-20″
Lakeland Terrier 15 – 18 lbs 16″-20″
Lhasa Apso 13 – 16 lbs 12″-16″
Louisiana Catahoula Leopard 50 – 90 lbs 17″-22″
Maltese 4 – 8 lbs 10″-14″
Manchester Terrier 11 – 13 lbs 12″-16″
Mastiff 130 – 230+ lbs 26″-38″
Miniature Pinscher 9 – 11 lbs 12″-18″
Newfoundland 110 – 152 lbs 26″-32″
Norwich Terrier 10 – 12 lbs 12″-16″
Old English Sheepdog 55 – 66 lbs 20″-26″
Papillon . 3 – 11 lbs 8″-12″
Pekingese 7 – 14 lbs 12″-16″
Pit Bull 30 – 70 lbs 20″-24″
 Pointer  45 – 75 lbs  20″-24″
Pomeranian 3 – 7 lbs 12″-16″
Poodle – Toy 12 – 17 lbs 10″-14″
 Poodle – Miniature  10 – 12 lbs  14″-18″
Poodle – Standard 45 – 70 lbs 16″-20″
Pug 14 – 18 lbs 16″-20″
Rottweiler 88 – 110 lbs 22″-30″
St Bernard 110 – 220 lbs 26″-32″
Samoyed 45 – 70 lbs 18″-22″
Schnauzer- Miniature 11 – 15 lbs 14″-18″
Schnauzer – Standard 33 – 40 lbs 16″-20″
Schnauzer – Giant 66 – 77 lbs 20″-24″
Scottish Terrier 18 – 22 lbs 16″-20″
Shar- Pei 35 – 55 lbs 18″-22″
 Shih Tzu  8 – 18 lbs  14″-16″
 Siberian Husky  35 – 60 lbs  16″-22″
 Silky Terrier   8 – 10 lbs  10″-14″
 Smooth Fox Terrier  15 – 18 lbs  14″-20″
 Springer Spaniel .  48 – 55 lbs  16″-20″
 Staffordshire Terrier  24 – 38 lbs  14″-20″
 Weimaraner  70 – 85 lbs  20″-24″
 Welsh Corgi  28 – 30 lbs  14″-18″
 Welsh Corgi (Cardigan)  25 – 38 lbs  18″-20″
 Welsh Corgi (Pembroke) 22 – 30 lbs  16″-20″
Welsh Springer Spaniel 35 – 45 lbs 16″-20″
Welsh Terrier 20 – 21 lbs 14″-18″
West Highland Terrier 15 – 22 lbs 14″-16″
West Highland White Terrier 15 – 22 lbs 14″-16″
Whippet 27 – 29 lbs 12″-16″
Wirehaired Fox Terrier 15 – 18 lbs 16″-22″
Yorkshire Terrier 8 – 9 lbs 6″-13″

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