Category Archives: Dog Behavior

How To Get Your Dog To Poop Outside Every Time

How To Get Your Dog To Poop Outside Every Time

Yet again, you just narrowly missed stepping in a log of dog poop inside your own home. Your dog may be great at peeing outside, but #2 is a different story.

Use these tips to break the habit and get your dog 100% potty trained.

Know Your Dog’s Poop Schedule

A dog has a short digestive tract compared to a human. They need to poop only 10-30 minutes after each meal.

If you free-feed, or leave your dog’s bowl full of food for them to graze on throughout the day, they won’t have regular, predictable poops.

Feed a puppy 3 meals each day. Adult dogs over 9 months old can eat two meals.

Your dog might hold out for more than 30 minutes after eating, especially if they’ve been punished for pooping indoors in the past. They may be confused or anxious and may wait until you are sleeping to sneak a poop.

Limit your dog’s freedom when they’re due for a poop. Take them out every 15 minutes until they’re successful.

Why Your Dog Poops Immediately After Coming Inside

You’ll spend 30 minutes outside, begging your dog to find a suitable spot to poop, and finally give up and go inside. The moment you do, your dog starts pooping on the floor.

Many dogs don’t feel the urge to poop when they’re outside. It might be too cold for them to relax their bowels. They may also be too distracted by the scents and sounds to concentrate on pooping. Your warm, soft carpet might make your dog feel the urge.

If you bring your dog inside after they fail to poop, you should not allow an accident to happen. Put your dog into their crate right away, or keep them close to you on their leash so they do not sneak off and poop.

In 10 to 15 minutes, take your dog outside again. Repeat until they poop. Only after they poop outside, should you allow them to run around and play freely.

When Your Dog Won’t Poop In The Snow Or Rain

Many dogs are great about pooping outside except during inclement weather.

Walking your dog outside more often in cold weather will help them adapt to cooler temperatures. That means you will have to brave the weather too, instead of simply letting your dog out in the backyard. Once your dog becomes more confident about pooping in the snow or rain, you won’t have to go outside with them.

Some stubborn poopers require compromise. Create a patch of grass in the snow by shoveling a “poop room,” or lay down a tarp or old shower curtain before the snowfall.

You can create a rain-free zone with a small canopy for your dog to poop under.

The Elusive Nighttime Pooper

Many dogs are great at pooping outside during the day, but regress at night.

Perhaps you are less likely to walk your dog after you’re cozy in your pajamas. Or, your dog might be holding their poop until you are asleep.

Try moving your dog’s dinner to an earlier time. That way, they’ll get a chance to poop before you shut down for the night.

You may also need to make it easier for your dog to wake you up when they have to go. You can teach your dog to bark, nose your hand or ring bells hanging from your doorknob to let you know when they need to go outside.

You can also crate your dog at night to prevent accidents. Dogs usually don’t poop where they sleep. However, crating can be stressful for your dog if they are not used to being confined.

Should You Punish A Naughty Pooper?

After hours of standing outside with no successful poops, it’s understandable when you become frustrated with your dog.

But punishing your dog only makes them nervous about pooping. They’ll learn to hold it in and wait for an opportunity to poop when you are not looking. They may also become more difficult about pooping on a leash while you are closeby.

Never punish your dog if you find poop in the house.

If you catch your dog in the act, try to get them to stop by redirecting them. Call them over to you or whistle, but do not clap, yell or otherwise scare them. Take them out immediately, even if they appear to have finished.

How To Get A Slow Pooper To Poop Faster

Teaching your dog to go #2 outside depends on you going outside with them. You need to make sure they poop. You also need to praise and reward them when they are successful. Don’t bring the treats outside. They may smell the treats and become too distracted to poop. Instead. praise your dog and go inside, then give them treats and reward them with free time to play inside.

If your dog is taking forever to poop while you’re with them, there’s a few things you can do to speed it up.

  • Go for a run. Running gets your dog’s bowels moving.
  • Create a poop nest. Some dogs like to poop on a soft area of grass, leaves, hay or dirt.
  • Get a longer leash. Your dog might feel shy about pooping six feet away. Clip several leashes together or get a long line.
  • Collect your dog’s poop from indoor accidents and put them in a corner of your yard. Your dog will be drawn to their own scent.
  • Try the matchstick trick. We’ve never tried this, and can’t personally recommend it, but it’s common for show dog handlers that need to evacuate their dog’s bowels before a dog show. Tear a match from a book of matches (it must be a paper match, not the wooden kind that comes in a box), moisten the red sulphur tip in your mouth, then insert the match halfway into your dog’s anus. The sulphur is said to irritate the dog’s anus just enough to get them to squat and push, triggering a bowel movement. Your dog may bite you if you try this, or you may accidentally reverse the steps and lick the match after it has been in your dog’s anus. You have been warned.

Do you have any dog poop stories, or tips for troubled puppy parents? Share in the comments!

The Scoop On Keeping Dogs As Pets

The Scoop On Keeping Dogs As Pets

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