All About Puppy And Kitten Vaccinations In Grand Prairie, Texas

All About Puppy And Kitten Vaccinations In Grand Prairie, Texas

You brought home a new addition to your family, and you want to keep them healthy for a long time. The best way to get your pet off to a good start is to get their vaccinations as soon as possible. It’s easy and affordable to have your dog or cat vaccinated in Grand Prairie, Texas.

Why And When To Take Your Puppy To Your Grand Prairie Vet

Ideally, your puppy will receive their first set of shots at 6 weeks old, before they are separated from their mother. If your puppy’s previous owner did not get them any shots, you will need to do this as soon as possible.

The first vet visit should include a vaccination to defend against Distemper and Parvovirus, as well as deworming to remove hookworms and roundworms. 

Distemper is a viral disease that can be passed through the air, through indirect or direct contact with a diseased animal. It’s highly contagious. The first symptoms are typically fever, watery, runny eyes and nose and lethargy. The dog will then experience hardened, thickened paw pads, vomiting and diarrhea, and finally, neurological symptoms like seizures.

There’s no cure for distemper, and it’s often fatal. If caught early, your vet can prescribe medications to alleviate symptoms, though it can take months for a dog to make a full recovery.

Your dog can catch distemper at a dog park, at other parks, on hikes and walks. Always keep your dog out of public areas where other dogs and wild animals may linger until they are fully vaccinated to reduce their risk of contracting this deadly virus.

Parvovirus is a viral disease that is passed through an infected animal’s feces. It is highly contagious and can live on surfaces for months. It can be carried inside your home on your shoes, so always take extra precautions in areas frequented by dogs, even if you do not bring your pup with you.

Symptoms of parvovirus include lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, and, most notably, bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea.

There is no medication that can kill the virus, but it often passes with intensive vet care and overnight hospital stays. A puppy typically needs IV fluids, anti-nausea medications and antibiotics to keep them hydrated so they can fight off the disease. Treatment is not always successful; many dogs die even with veterinary treatment.

Intestinal worms like hookworms, tapeworms and roundworms are extremely common in puppies. They’re usually passed through their mother’s milk. Every puppy should be dewormed even if they do not show signs of worms in their feces. After deworming at your vet, your puppy may defecate long, spaghetti-like strands of worms. Do not be alarmed; these are the dying bodies of worms that were once inside your pup. Your vet will typically start your puppy on monthly heartworm pills, most of which provide regular deworming to keep your dog free of most common internal parasites.

In three to four weeks, your puppy will need to see their Grand Prairie veterinarian again for booster shots and their first Bordella shot.

Bordella, commonly known as Kennel Cough, is a respiratory infection that spreads quickly at groomers, dog parks, doggy daycares and shelters. It’s not usually fatal in healthy adult dogs, but can kill a puppy.

In another three to four weeks, your puppy will need their final puppy visit for booster shots plus their first rabies shot. Then, you’re all done for the year!

Rabies is a fatal viral infection. Your puppy can only contract rabies if they are bitten by an infected animal. Almost all infected animals will die within 7 to 10 days. Symptoms include lethargy, aggression, drooling, fever and paralysis. If your dog is ever in a fight with another animal, and you are unsure if the other animal could be infected, see your vet even if your dog has had the rabies vaccination.

Why And When To Take Your Kitten To Your Grand Prairie Vet

Kittens, just like puppies, are prone to a few common yet deadly illnesses.

Your kitten’s first vet visit will include a vaccination against Distemper and deworming

Distemper is a viral infection that affects cats. It is spread through the blood, feces and urine of affected cats, as well as fleas. Your cat should not spend time outdoors until they are fully vaccinated, and even then, should always be closely supervised.

Symptoms of feline distemper include loss of appetite, rough coat, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, fever, and, eventually neurological symptoms such as seizures and wobbling or lack of coordination. If your cat survives the first 48 hours with veterinary care, it is likely that they will make a full recovery within a few weeks. However, it can be deadly, especially to young kittens.

In three to four weeks, your cat will need another vaccination against Distemper, a vaccination for Feline Leukemia and additional deworming

Feline Leukemia is a contagious viral infection that weakens your cat’s immune system and leaves them vulnerable to secondary infections and certain cancers. Symptoms include lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, weight loss, tumors and abnormal tissue growth.

Intestinal worms like roundworms, tapeworms and hookworms are common in kittens. Your cat may pass dead or dying worms in their stool soon after their vet visit; this is totally normal.

In another three to four weeks, your kitten will need deworming, booster shots as well as a vaccination for Rabies.

Rabies is a fatal viral infection. Your kitten can only contract rabies if they are bitten by an infected animal. Most infected animals die within 7 to 10 days. Symptoms include lethargy, aggression, drooling, fever and paralysis. If your cat is ever in a fight with another animal, and you are unsure if the other animal could be infected, see your vet even if your cat has had the rabies vaccination.

Where To Get Kitten And Puppy Vaccinations In Grand Prairie, Texas

Grand Prairie Animal Services and Prairie Paws Adoption Center 

Phone: (972) 237-8575

Address:

2222 W. Warrior Trail
Grand Prairie, TX  75052

See this vet’s website for more information!


Animal Clinic of Grand Prairie

Phone: (972) 262-2684

Address:
612 N. Belt Line Road

Grand Prairie, TX 75050

See this vet’s website for more information!


Parkway Animal Hospital

Phone: (972) 263-7277

Address:

629 North Carrier Parkway
Grand Prairie, TX 75050

See this vet’s website for more information!


303 Animal Clinic

Phone: (972) 263-3600

Address:

505 West Pioneer Parkway

Grand Prairie, TX 75051

See this vet’s website for more information!


Banfield Pet Hospital

Phone: (972) 606-2495

Address:

2309 West Interstate 20
Grand Prairie, TX 75052

See this vet’s website for more information!


Carrier Animal Hospital

Phone: (972)262-1581

Address:

2405 S Carrier Pkwy

Grand Prairie, TX 75051

See this vet’s website for more information!


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